Tornado safe rooms and Career and Professional Center at Maize High School

The need: 

Maize High is USD 266’s largest building and the only school that does not have a FEMA shelter. It houses 1,354 students and 208 staff members, including teachers, administrators and paras. The building is 303,000 square feet. During inclement weather, students and employees seek shelter in interior hallways and rooms, including restrooms.

Please click here to view KWCH coverage of the tornado safe room need: Parents want FEMA shelter at high school, April 8, 2015

Maize High and Maize South High schools in some cases offer different Career and Technical Education programs because of space and access. Students' opportunities to take classes that offer college credit, licenses and skills to prepare them for future careers may be limited by the school they attend. It is an inconsistency in curriculum.

Our vision:

The bond would add two shelters (pictured above in red), each serving an additional purpose to maximize space and utility. A shelter on the north end would serve as a multi-purpose space, functioning among other things as an athletics lobby and entryway.

A shelter on the south end would double as a new Career and Technical Education addition for Maize High and Maize South High school students. This would be a place for the district’s professional programs that offer college credit, licenses and skills to prepare students for future careers.

The center would house programs for Health Science, Agriculture/Horticulture, Culinary Arts (pictured at right), Communications and Project Lead the Way – Maize Schools’ STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) program. The projects would add 11,000 square feet of FEMA shelter space.

The cost:

$1,984,500 for the storm shelters and $9,087,750 for the Career and Professional Center

The benefit:

Students and staff members would be able to seek shelter in a federally recognized and safe storm shelter, essential during storm and tornado season. The Career and Professional Center will provide all Maize USD 266 high school students with equal access to programs that could launch their careers and prepare them for higher-paying jobs immediately after graduation. Currently, some of our Pathways professional programs are only offered at one high school, an inconsistency in our curriculum that puts students at an unfair advantage.

Please click here to view KWCH coverage of the FEMA shelter need: Parents want FEMA shelter at high school, April 8, 2015

AT RIGHT: Maize High School junior Skylar Holman tells Kansas Department of Education Interim Commissioner Brad Neuenswander about the school’s agriculture program during a special event in Fall 2014. The bond includes a space for this and other nationally recognized Career and Technical Education programs to prepare students for careers and further education after high school.